The Relationship Between Sleep and Night Eating on Weight Loss in Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

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dc.contributor.advisor Hamera, Edna
dc.contributor.author Huynh, Thu-Nhi
dc.contributor.author Hamera, Edna en
dc.contributor.editor Neuberger, Geri
dc.coverage.temporal Fall 2011 - Spring 2012
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-25T16:28:28Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-25T16:28:28Z
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.date.created 2012
dc.date.issued 2012-07-24
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/1097
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Insomnia and night eating is associated with weight gain in individuals with Severe Mental Illness (Palmese, et al., 2011). Poor sleep, night eating, and psychiatric medications may hinder weight loss which, in turn, can sustain obesity in individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Purpose: The study examined the relationship of sleep and avoidance of night eating on weight loss in individuals who participated in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Program for Weight Loss. Question: Will self-report of the frequency of getting enough sleep and avoidance of night eating predict weight loss? Design: This secondary analysis focuses on data from participants in a weight loss intervention group (N=34) after 3 month of intervention. Methodology: Sleep and night eating scores from the Pender Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II and total score of the Night Eating Questionnaire, respectively, served as predictor variables. Changes in body weight from baseline to 3 months was the criterion variable. Findings: No significant correlation (.354, p=0.24) was found between the Night Eating Questionnaire score and weight loss while report of sleep and weight loss were correlated (-3.44, p=0.05). Because scores on participants' perception of getting enough sleep and total score for the Night Eating Questionnaire were intercorrelated (-.507, p=0.09) and because only scores from 12 participants on the Night Eating Questionnaire were available, a bivariate regression was performed on weight loss and frequency of getting enough sleep. The frequency of getting enough sleep that accounted for weight loss was low (R2= .119). Discussion: Self- report of getting enough sleep is a poor predictor of weight loss. Future studies examining weight loss in this population should use a more robust measure of sleep, and an increased sample size.
dc.description.sponsorship University of Kansas School of Nursing. Bachelor of Science in Nursing Honors Program
dc.format.extent 15 pages
dc.relation.ispartofseries The Journal of BSN Honors Research
dc.title The Relationship Between Sleep and Night Eating on Weight Loss in Individuals with Severe Mental Illness
dc.subject.cinahl Mental Disorders
dc.subject.cinahl Night Eating Syndrome
dc.subject.cinahl Weight Loss
dc.subject.cinahl Obesity
rft.spage 051

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