Complementary Therapy to Relieve Pediatric Cancer Therapy-Related Symptoms in the USA

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dc.contributor.advisor Williams, Phoebe D.
dc.contributor.advisor Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat
dc.contributor.author Slaven, Annemarie
dc.contributor.author Williams, Phoebe D. en
dc.contributor.author Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat en
dc.contributor.editor Neuberger, Geri
dc.coverage.temporal Fall 2011 - Spring 2012
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-25T16:28:35Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-25T16:28:35Z
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.date.created 2012
dc.date.issued 2012-07-24
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/1102
dc.description.abstract Children undergoing treatment for cancer often receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy and may experience many symptoms linked to these treatments. This study examined complementary therapies and self-care or dependent-care methods used by pediatric patients and parents to alleviate symptoms during cancer treatments. The specific purposes of this study were to assess symptoms and the complementary therapies and self-care or dependent-care methods used by pediatric patients and parents during cancer treatments. Orem’s self-care/dependent-care concept was used to guide the analysis of the care pediatric patients received. Secondary analysis was done on data collected from a cross-sectional, multi-site study in the Midwestern and Southwestern USA. The sample included 92 parents/children ages 1-17 years old; 52% were females; 16 were less than 5 years old; 53 were 5-11 years old, and 23 were 12-17 years old. Of the cancer diagnoses reported, 56% had leukemia and 44% had other cancer types. The 30-item Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist for Children (TRSC-C) was used to record patients’ symptom occurrence and severity on a 5-pt scale (0, no symptom; 4, “A whole lot”). The Symptom Alleviation: Self-Care Methods (SA:SCM) tool was used to identify methods parents used to alleviate therapy-related symptoms. To address the study purposes, descriptive data and content analyses were conducted. Symptom occurrences of 19 symptoms were reported by 40% or more of the patients and had a mean severity of “2” or “Quite a bit.” The top five symptoms included nausea, feeling sluggish, hair loss, loss of appetite and vomiting. Of the six categories of self-care or dependent-care methods and complementary therapies, four were found useful; herbal treatments were not mentioned. The two categories most utilized were Prescribed Medications and Mind Body Control. Assessing patient-reported and parent-reported symptoms and the use of self-care and dependent-care methods and complementary therapies help parents cope and help their children. en
dc.description.sponsorship University of Kansas School of Nursing. Bachelor of Science in Nursing Honors Program
dc.relation.ispartofseries The Journal of BSN Honors Research
dc.title Complementary Therapy to Relieve Pediatric Cancer Therapy-Related Symptoms in the USA
dc.subject.cinahl Alternative Therapies
dc.subject.cinahl Chemotherapy, Cancer
dc.subject.cinahl Radiotherapy
dc.subject.cinahl Child, Medically Fragile
dc.subject.cinahl Neoplasms/in Adolescence
dc.subject.cinahl Oncologic Care
rft.spage 113

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