Diffusion theory and telemedicine adoption by Kansas health-care providers: Critical factors in telemedicine adoption for improved patient access.

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dc.contributor.author Spaulding, RJ
dc.contributor.author Russo, T
dc.contributor.author Cook, DJ
dc.contributor.author Doolittle, GC
dc.date.accessioned 2007-11-21T22:01:31Z
dc.date.available 2007-11-21T22:01:31Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.issn 1357-633X en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/306
dc.description.abstract Twenty counties in Kansas were randomly selected from those designated as rural on the basis of their populations. A sample of 356 physicians and physicians' assistants in these counties was chosen. A postal survey was sent to the identified providers up to three times. One hundred and eighty-six of the questionnaires were returned (a response rate of 52%). In all, 76% of the respondents were physicians, 76% were men and 42% were family practitioners. Practitioners were classified as adopters or non-adopters of telemedicine, based on their report of whether they had ever referred one or more patients for a health-care consultation via telemedicine. Of the 167 participants who marked this item, 30 (18%) were adopters and 137 (82%) were non-adopters. Among the adopters, 16 (53%) said that they expected to use telemedicine with about the same frequency or more often in the future. In contrast, 61 (45%) non-adopters reported that they did not expect to refer patients by telemedicine in the future and 51 (37%) were unsure. Neither age (r = 0.16, P = 0.44) nor gender (chi2 = 2.35, P = 0.13) was related to the adoption variable or the number of referrals made to telemedicine clinics. The results suggest that adopters and non-adopters of telemedicine perceive its value very differently, and that an opportunity exists to promote the concept to non-adopters more effectively. en
dc.format.extent 7258 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Royal Society of Medicine Press en
dc.subject Diffusion of Innovation en
dc.subject Health Services Accessibility en
dc.subject Telemedicine en
dc.subject.mesh Kansas en
dc.title Diffusion theory and telemedicine adoption by Kansas health-care providers: Critical factors in telemedicine adoption for improved patient access. en
dc.type Article en

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