Ethical Concerns with Opt-Out Testing in Comparison to Voluntary Counseling Testing

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dc.contributor.author White, Monica
dc.date.accessioned 2009-07-02T20:11:08Z
dc.date.available 2009-07-02T20:11:08Z
dc.date.issued 2009-07-02T20:11:08Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/751
dc.description.abstract HIV testing is now placed under the general consent to treat. What is not clear are the cost and consequences that accompany these CDC recommendations (Holtgrave, 2007). Written informed consent promotes patient information and awareness, while protecting patients and physicians; omitting counseling and disclosures may eliminate patient education about HIV and high risk behaviors (Donoghoe, Lane, & Wolf, 2007). The ethical issue with routine testing is the elimination of HIV test specific written consent and pretest counseling. The lack of adequate information related to patients rights to refuse testing along with the risks and benefits are also ethical concerns. Routine testing may be met with barriers from individual states. Most states have pretest counseling incorporated in their HIV testing laws (Donoghoe, Lane, & Wolf, 2007). Opt-out testing may come with consequences such as failure to reduce high risk behavior (Holtgrave, 2007). en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.title Ethical Concerns with Opt-Out Testing in Comparison to Voluntary Counseling Testing en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.subject.cinahl Ethics, Medical en_US
dc.subject.cinahl Consent en_US

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