Ethical Considerations of Pharmaceutical Colonialism

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dc.contributor.author Lee, Alexandra
dc.contributor.editor Martin, David
dc.contributor.editor Godfrey, Nelda
dc.contributor.editor Brewer, M. Kathleen
dc.contributor.editor Greischar-Billiard, Jo Ellen
dc.coverage.temporal Fall 2010 - Spring 2011
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-26T15:04:57Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-26T15:04:57Z
dc.date.created 2011
dc.date.issued 2011-08-26
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/968
dc.description Alexandra Lee is a native of Prairie Village, Kansas. While at the KU School of Nursing she obtained an Endowment Scholarship. Her scholarship achievements are recognized by receiving the Golden Key award. She is a member of Delta Chapter-Sigma Theta Tau International. While at the KU SON she was selected to travel to Johannesburg, South Africa where she participated in providing nursing care to the country's citizens. en_US
dc.description.abstract The complexity of the ethical issue being depicted is one that has transcended generations, bringing light to issues such as human rights, distributive justice, and the worldly effects of globalization. The subject termed "pharmaceutical colonialism" is in part characterized by the colonization of developing countries in efforts of contributing to the sphere of pharmaceutical knowledge. The purpose of this descriptive essay is to enhance the readers knowledge of ethical considerations of importance to nursing regarding the conduct of clinical trials in developing countries. One of the most relevant nursing implications of this ethically, controversial issue is that of cultural awareness. It is critical for nurses to be informed not only about the health care in their own country, but health care policies, or lack thereof, in other countries. As a result, it is our duty as nurses to be aware of the cultural differences that may arise when presenting a document of informed consent to the patient, and to allow for any interventions, such as a translator, to be present in order to ensure that the patient not only understands the procedure, but also alternative treatments, side effects, and expected outcomes. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF NURSING BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING PROGRAM AND DELTA CHAPTER OF SIGMA THETA INTERNATIONAL en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents Editorial Mandatory Gardasil Vaccination in Adolescents Biethman, E Adolescent Bariatric Surgery: A life saving procedure or another failing technique Blurton, B R To Treat or Not To Treat? Cancer During Pregnancy Dudley, K It’s a Thin Line Between Confidentiality and Disclosing Patient Information. Horn, K G Ethical Considerations of Pharmaceutical Colonialism Lee, A Questioning the Persistent Vegetative State Medis, K J Pediatric Advance Directives: A Voice for the Voiceless Nelson, H Patient Autonomy and End-of-Life Care: Cross-Cultural Considerations Silvey, L Family Presence During Resuscitation in Adult Patients Tafreshi, D R Women’s Self-Help Groups in India: Gender Equity, a Human Right Wurtz, H
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries The Journal of Undergraduate Nursing Writing
dc.subject Pharmaceutical Industry en_US
dc.subject Ethics en_US
dc.title Ethical Considerations of Pharmaceutical Colonialism en_US
dc.type Article en_US
rft.spage 38 en_US

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