Patient Autonomy and End-of-Life Care: Cross-Cultural Considerations

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dc.contributor.author Silvey, Linus
dc.contributor.editor David Martin
dc.contributor.editor Nelda Godfrey
dc.contributor.editor M. Kathleen Brewer
dc.contributor.editor Jo Ellen Greischar-Billiard
dc.coverage.temporal Fall 2010 - Spring 2011
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-26T16:04:24Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-26T16:04:24Z
dc.date.created 2011
dc.date.issued 2011-08-26
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2271/971
dc.description Linus Silvey is from Overland Park, Kansas. While at the KU School of Nursing he received a KU Endowment scholarship for the 2009-2010 and the 2010-2011 academic year. He also received the prestigious Clinical Excellence Level III Award for his outstanding performance in the critical care clinical area. en_US
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this paper is to describe the influence of culture and religion on end-of-life decision making and advance care planning. Over the last few decades there has been increasing amounts of attention and controversy on end-of-life planning. Recently there has been a growing interest in cultural and religious influences on end-of-life planning. Members of the multidisciplinary team need to be aware of the practices in different religions and cultures regarding end-of-life care. In the United States, patient autonomy is the primary focus of ethical decision making in health care regarding end-of-life planning (Johnstone, & Kanitsaki, 2009). In some cultures patient autonomy may not be a valued ethical element in end-of-life planning but seen primarily as a duty of the family. Nurses along with other health care professionals have a fundamental responsibility to assist patients and family with the end-of-life decision making process. Being culturally competent is more than having a basic understanding of different cultural norms. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS SCHOOL OF NURSING BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING PROGRAM AND DELTA CHAPTER OF SIGMA THETA INTERNATIONAL en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents Editorial Mandatory Gardasil Vaccination in Adolescents Biethman, E Adolescent Bariatric Surgery: A life saving procedure or another failing technique Blurton, B R To Treat or Not To Treat? Cancer During Pregnancy Dudley, K It’s a Thin Line Between Confidentiality and Disclosing Patient Information. Horn, K G Ethical Considerations of Pharmaceutical Colonialism Lee, A Questioning the Persistent Vegetative State Medis, K J Pediatric Advance Directives: A Voice for the Voiceless Nelson, H Patient Autonomy and End-of-Life Care: Cross-Cultural Considerations Silvey, L Family Presence During Resuscitation in Adult Patients Tafreshi, D R Women’s Self-Help Groups in India: Gender Equity, a Human Right Wurtz, H
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries The Journal of Undergraduate Nursing Writing;
dc.subject Patient Autonomy en_US
dc.subject End-of-Life Care en_US
dc.subject Cross-Cultural Considerations en_US
dc.subject Nursing en_US
dc.title Patient Autonomy and End-of-Life Care: Cross-Cultural Considerations en_US
dc.type Article en_US
rft.spage 64 en_US

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